New Hampshire Legal Assistance

Helping to balance the scales of justice for everyone since 1971.

For the media

Members of the media interested in speaking with a New Hampshire Legal Assistance advocate about a case or for a story about issues that affect our clients - including poverty, housing discrimination, foreclosures, elder abuse, domestic violence, or access to education - should contact Communications Manager Sarah Palermo at 369-6650 or spalermo@nhla.org.

For a full list of our staff advocates' areas of expertise, please click here.

Latest News:

NHLA announces conference about access to housing in New Hampshire for immigrants: The conference, to be held on Tuesday, June 21, will include a discussion of access to subsidized housing and shelter programs, as well as the language-access obligations of housing entities that received federal funds. For more information, click here.

April 26, 2016: Summit generates plan for NH's response to elder financial exploitation: Nearly 140 leaders from criminal justice, financial services, legal services and community-based supports from all regions of the state gathered at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord on April 20 for Combating Elder Financial Exploitation in New Hampshire: A Leadership Summit. Participants learned about effective strategies, shared perspectives and generated ideas for improving our state’s response to elder financial exploitation in a collaborative, coordinated way. To learn more about the results of the summit, or learn about upcoming regional meetings on elder financial exploitation, click here.

January 12, 2016: NHLA joins ACLU-NH in a federal suit challenging the city of Manchester's unconstitutional anti-panhandling practices:   The American Civil Liberties Union of New Hampshire (ACLU-NH) and New Hampshire Legal Assistance (NHLA) together filed a federal lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the Manchester police department’s practice of detaining, dispersing, and charging peaceful panhandlers for allegedly “obstructing vehicular traffic on public streets” under New Hampshire’s disorderly conduct statute, even when the panhandlers are in a public place and do not step in the roadway. This lawsuit is being brought on behalf of Plaintiff Theresa M. Petrello, an Army and Navy veteran who has panhandled to make ends meet. On June 3, 2015, the Manchester police department cited her for disorderly conduct after she, without stepping in a roadway, engaged in peaceful panhandling speech directed at motorists from a public place. Click here to read more.

December 10, 2015: NHLA achieves settlement for Deaf resident who complained of discrimination at Manchester Housing and Redevelopment Authority

NHLA protects low-income tenants from the dangers of lead paint

NHLA welcomes 2015 summer interns

NHLA, Pro Bono expand free advice program for low-income debtors

Clients and supporters tell N.H. House: NHLA is "an important and needed cause in New Hampshire"

April 15 is deadline for property tax help applications

Recent media coverage of NHLA:

Legal aid at the doctor's office might help low-income patients, New Hampshire Public Radio, April 13, 2016

Standing against increasing the cost of open government:

The Union Leader joins the Nashua Telegraph, the New Hampshire Press Association, ACLU-NH, New Hampshire Legal Assistance, the New Hampshire Coalition for Open Democracy, New Hampshire Right to Life and the New England First Amendment Coalition in opposing HB 1611. Our government should not use fees to limit our right to know. Click here to read more.

NHLA work with New Hampshire Foreclosure Relief Project featured in Concord Monitor article, January 3, 2016

The Telegraph of Nashua features NHLA's on-going outreach to clients of the Nashua Soup Kitchen and Shelter.

Legal aid shines a light on powerless campers' struggle: Concord Monitor, May 1, 2015

Candia debt clinic offers free legal assistance to residents in need: New Hampshire Union Leader, April 23, 2015

In Berlin, victims of domestic violence no longer risk eviction for calling the police for help: New Hampshire Public Radio, Feb. 23, 2015